Advice on this rear seal.

Discussion in 'General Maverick/Comet' started by satchelmcqueen, Feb 21, 2019.

  1. satchelmcqueen

    satchelmcqueen Member

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    I am go8ng to replace the seal in the back of my 302. This doesnt look like any of the vids ive watched. Where is the seal and why does this look different? Trying to learn the internals as I freshen this motor up before install.
     

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  2. yellow75

    yellow75 MCCI Oregon State Rep Supporting Member

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    You cant see the seal if it is the rear main seal you are talking about, it is under the rear main bearing cap. It will be a 2 piece seal with half going under the crankshaft and the other half in the bearing cap. If you are talking about the rear seal on oil pan it just fits in the groove of the rear main bearing cap
     
  3. satchelmcqueen

    satchelmcqueen Member

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    ok so in this video is this a different block? this is what i thought i was dealing with. so theres a 1 piece seal vs a 2 piece seal?
     
  4. satchelmcqueen

    satchelmcqueen Member

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    this must be the kind we i have?
     
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  5. yellow75

    yellow75 MCCI Oregon State Rep Supporting Member

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    Yes you have the 2 piece seal, Ford started using the one piece seal in 82 or 83
     
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  6. satchelmcqueen

    satchelmcqueen Member

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    thanks. now im learning something.
     
  7. yellow75

    yellow75 MCCI Oregon State Rep Supporting Member

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    When you bolt everything back together make sure that you apply some sealant/ locktite on the bolts that hold flex plate/flywheel on because you could possibly get an oil leak through the bolt holes
     
  8. groberts101

    groberts101 Member

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    Right on, Mike. The other thing I see small issues with through the years is guys getting too liberal with oil during crank/seal installation. If any of that oil gets between the 2 ends of each seal then the SMALL dab of silicone doesn't stick to those interfaces very well and can potentially weep over time. Easy to see this during later removals as the silicone just falls away and may be wet with oil since it wasn't adhering very well.

    What I do nowadays is to "prep the seals" with 80 grit sandpaper by scuffing each end and including the grooves backsides. Then clean all those same area's, except for the lips themselves as acetone has a mild softening effect, also including the block and cap grooves while your at it. Then I use lightly brushed aviation sealer or tacky gasket dressing for each groove(block and cap) along with greatstuff rtv for SMALL dabs at each ends interface. Go very easy on oiling that rear bearing/crank main journal so when you drop it in the seal ends stay clean. If any contamination then use q-tip dipped in acetone the reclean them. Also be sure to torque the main caps right away so the rtv doesn't skin over or dry too much before it's all cranked down to spec.
     
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  9. satchelmcqueen

    satchelmcqueen Member

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    This is my first time so I want to be sure I understand. I knew from a video to use a thin line of rvt on .The ends of the cap. So do you also mean to use it lightly in the grooves where the seal sits and well as a tiny dab at the 2 ends of each seal where they will join when the cap is put back in place? Ty sir.
     
  10. yellow75

    yellow75 MCCI Oregon State Rep Supporting Member

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    I would not put it in the grooves that the seal sits. I watched the video and it is the same as I do when installing a seal so just follow its instructions, the hard part is getting the bearing cap back on with the seal protruding from it. Not really that hard to do just have to be aware of getting it on correctly and not damaging it. As far as the rtv goes the video says to follow instructions on the seal packaging but it will not hurt to use a small amount on the seal ends
     
  11. satchelmcqueen

    satchelmcqueen Member

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    Thank you. My main concern is getting to crank to lift just a slight bit so I can put the seal under it. I suppose I'm going to have to undo all the caps to move it huh? I know this is probably easy as ive done it before 25yrs ago but it was always a tear down and not a "put it back together" thing. Lol. Ill go slow.
     
  12. groberts101

    groberts101 Member

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    No silicone in the grooves.. only non-hardening aviation or gaskatack is what I use. Years ago many rebuilders were using hardening type sealants in the grooves and were a pita to remove and clean. They did it to reduce callbacks and warranty work. I do it because a weep is still a leak and the harder you run the motor and more it wears out(increasing blowby and crankcase pressure) the greater the likelihood the weep will eventually turn into a drip. It's amazing how heat and pressure can force oil through the smallest of gaps. My motors never weep or leak anything from front or rear seals and I attribute that to trial and error method which lead to my current state of overkill for most things I do.

    PS. Gaskacinch or similar also keeps the seals from moving around during assembly.
     
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