347 Stroker Build

Discussion in 'Technical' started by Wjtkb18, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. Wjtkb18

    Wjtkb18 Member

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    Hey guys, I'm not really new here but I have lost access to my old account due to losing that email/ password and such. Anyways, I have been working on building this thing for at least 8 years. So here is what I have thus far:
    Scat Forged Rotating Assy.-
    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/sca-1-45305be/overview/
    Dart SHP Block-
    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/drt-31364175/overview/
    Holly 750-
    https://www.summitracing.com/parts/hly-0-76750rd/overview/
    MSD 6AL Digital Box
    Edelbrock Elite Tall Valve covers
    Edlebrock Elite Air Cleaner

    This is going to stay as a n/a motor. Right now im shopping for a set of heads, Rocker Arms, push rods, cam (possibly custom ground), and a intake manifold. I would like to get the most out of this motor as possible and i'm not sure about a few things, I've been looking at the AFR 195 w/ the 58CC combustion chamber but i'm worried about it being too much compression (I do intend on driving it on the street from time to time not very far since it will have a fuel cell in it and will primary be a race car) Just let me know what you guys would do, i'm just afraid that I may be over thinking this.
     
  2. Maverocket

    Maverocket Bob Williams Supporting Member

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    The ballpark compression ratio will be around 10:1 with 58cc heads and flat top pistons. Deck clearance and gasket thickness are variables.
    You said you wanted the most out of this engine so compression is your friend, may not get away with pump gas tho. The camshaft is the biggest factor when it comes to streetability.
     
  3. Krazy Comet

    Krazy Comet Tom

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  4. Hotrock

    Hotrock MCCI Member Supporting Member

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    My friend if it has taken you eight years to pull together what you have, I would wait on any head or camshaft purchase until you get all the small parts and the short block assembled. At your current rate of progress any head and camshaft combination you purchase in the near future will be outdated by the time you are ready for installation.

    I'm being serious here!
     
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  5. greasemonkey

    greasemonkey Burnin corn

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    Call Ron at Fox lake. He has some good Head ,cam combinations. And is very knowledgeable. I would watch any (ready to bolt on) heads. I've recently seen a few sets the valves don't seat correctly and the springs aren't correct.
     
  6. Wjtkb18

    Wjtkb18 Member

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    I really found that video quiet informative. As for the time frame from the past eight years, peoples lives change, I was back in high school when all this started, I'm now 24 almost 25 with a decent paying job, my own house and everything now, so financially i'm in a much better situation. I have a set of e-street heads and such but they are going on another motor. Im not afraid to spend a decent amount of money on something, i'm not looking at a pull out custom build where each part is hand made or anything like that. I'm not greatly concerned about it running on pump gas, it can just run on race fuel, I don't mind that.
     
  7. Hotrock

    Hotrock MCCI Member Supporting Member

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    AFR would be a great choice for your build. They are what I run. Your pistons are not compatible with Trick Flow heads. Fox Lake does amazing things with the Edelbrock e-street heads but by the time all is finished you will probably have more invested in the e-streets than in a set of AFRs.

    Maverocket is correct, your static compression ratio will be a little over 10.1 to 1 assuming zero deck clearance and a 0.04 compressed gasket thickness. No need for race fuel.

    I've included my compression calculations.

    Compression Ratio Scan.jpg
     
  8. greasemonkey

    greasemonkey Burnin corn

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    His e street heads are less than the afr 205 and flow is really close plus their all hand assembled by him with Manley parts.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2018
  9. bmcdaniel

    bmcdaniel Senile Member Supporting Member

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    Since you're not running high compression, boost or nitrous I wouldn't bother with the MSD box.
     
  10. Wjtkb18

    Wjtkb18 Member

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    I was thinking about down the road doing a supercharger, but as stated that would be alter on down the road (I understand cam, heads and everything is different when it comes to a boosted motor)
     
  11. jasonwthompson

    jasonwthompson Member

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    You need to decide before building if it will be supercharged or not. The addition of a supercharger will make a difference in what the cam, head, carb/intake combination needs to be, and what compression ratio you should be targeting. On a street motor that is supercharged 10:1 may be a bit high.
     
  12. 71gold

    71gold Frank Cooper Supporting Member

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    I think also a Guy on here spent a couple years collecting motor parts to only have bought a defected cam...no return.
     
  13. Wjtkb18

    Wjtkb18 Member

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    So hypothetically IF I were to go supercharged, I would have to go with a dished piston correct?
     
  14. groberts101

    groberts101 Member Supporting Member

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    Absolutely. Higher compression and forced induction do not play well at all unless it's a full on race effort engine drinking pure racing gas.

    Pretty serious stuff($$$$) you're asking very basic questions about here and I'd highly recommend you start studying basic engine function hard if you want to make a powerful engine live, let alone how to build one in the first place. If you don't understand the underlying flow and combustion dynamics involved it's VERY easy to throw away lots of cash towards the school of hard knocks.

    My personal recommendations for people building stouter street motors is to base the compression ratio requirements(on the combo of parts first and foremost of course) on the fuel AND the experience of the driver him(or her) self. IOW, don't try to run and tune pump gas for 11.5/1 static compression ratio when you have very limited fuel and ignition tuning skills. 9.5/1 leaves much power on the table but it'll still run nearly forever even with a few fouled plugs and unperfected fuel and ignition curve. Think of compression ratio increase as eating into your safety margins reserve. Running closer to the edge of detonation gives you far less reserve when something's not exactly right. Much over about 10:1 with aluminum heads is usually getting too octane intolerant for most to deal with and maintain in tip-top on a pump gas tune. Have to learn to pick your gas stations too.. since bad gas will kill a motor running closer to the edge of its tune.
     
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  15. Wjtkb18

    Wjtkb18 Member

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    Okay, this is why i'm asking questions. Im just going to stick with a na motor I know the bottom end is pretty much bullet proof. So going to stay with a higher comp. What would a good top end package be? Car is mainly a track car, but will be driven on the street as stated. Would be wise to get a 46 or 56 instead of a 58cc head instead, just to get the compression up a little?
     

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