Alluminum flywheel?

Discussion in 'General Maverick/Comet' started by Kris, May 29, 2018.

  1. Kris

    Kris Member

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    I'm gonna put my 302/t5 back in soon, but my flywheel looks pretty hammered. I was thinking of upgrading. I was wondering what anyone might have tried and could recomend. Will I notice any difference? Durability? Vaule? Should i go aluminum, stainless or just stay stock? ( I'll be doin the clutch too of course) just trying to get some ideas
     
  2. dyent

    dyent Member

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    If you just have a relatively stock or mildly built 302, just stick with the stock flywheel, depending on how bad your flywheel is, it can be resurfaced, how is the ring gear? Brand new replacement OEM stock flywheels are fairly inexpensive, Auto Zone, Summit, Jeg's etc........
    David
     
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  3. Kris

    Kris Member

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    Its 300-ish hp, nothing extreme, the ring gear is a lil worn and the clutch surface looks like it has lil cracks but it could be just from being glazed over. Would rather replace than bother resurface/gearing, If theres nothing to be gained from a fancy whizbang flywheel then I'll go stock I guess.
     
  4. groberts101

    groberts101 Member Supporting Member

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    Stuff like this is very subjective. So basically you just have to weigh the added cost vs gain from each design. From there you'll need to have some understanding of the potential gain(or loss) that will be seen between the various designs. Either way you decide.. doesn't make much sense to use old beat up components if they're not rare, are easily found and rather inexpensive and it's already apart for freshening anyways.

    In a nutshell.. the aluminum flywheels reduced rotating mass will allow slightly better throttle response and quicker engine rpm gain.. faster rev's. Downshifting and rpm gain is more instantanious feeling. Nothing completely earth shattering.. but fairly easily perceived nonetheless.

    If you really like to bang the gears harder or even powershift(scratch rubber on the upshifts).. about the only downside to lighter flywheel mass is the reduction in inertia. That reduction in rotating mass/inertia then causes the motor to slow down quicker during harder/power shifts which results in less rubber being scratched from the tires on the upshifts. Basically softens the torque multiplication factor of the spinning flywheels sudden change in rpm during shifts. Again.. nothing drastic but fairly easily perceived.
     
  5. Kris

    Kris Member

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    Any idea on the longevity of the aluminum flywheel? It would seem being softer would mean more wear, or does it need a different clutch? Im building more for road race rather than drag, so I like the idea of quicker gear changes and fast revs. But I know the benefit of a weighted flywheel from hillclimbing dirt bikes too. IDK its prob gonna come down to price. Anyone know whos got the good deals?
     
  6. groberts101

    groberts101 Member Supporting Member

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    The aluminum stuff has a steel insert and ring gear. Full aluminum would never work.

    Centerforce, mcleod, hayes, ford motorsport, etc, etc.. tons of options. Just need to make sure to match the rotating weight factor of your engine to make everything balance out and avoid vibration.
     
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  7. Kris

    Kris Member

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  8. CaptainComet

    CaptainComet Large Member Supporting Member

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    I would lean toward a steel flywheel for a street car. I would think that the added inertia a motor speeds you typically drive at will help launch the car. Not as important for a light vehicle like ours, compared to heavier cars, but still, I think it would be much smoother from dead stops.
     
  9. groberts101

    groberts101 Member Supporting Member

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    Hi Cap. Actually, if you think about the weight being slowed down more easily during shifts/clutch engagements.. the aluminum flywheel gives that softer effect as it speed matches more quickly. Plus I think he wanted a little more road racer than drag.. so personally, I'd still rec the aluminum one over steel.

    If you've ever experienced the faster rev's gained from a smaller torque converter diameter.. it's somewhat similar in that respect. Rev's/accelerates quicker but just a bit softer on the shifts, is all.
     

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