Cracked Intake Manifold?

Discussion in 'General Maverick/Comet' started by Renton5, Oct 17, 2015.

  1. Maverick Dude

    Maverick Dude Member

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    Have at it. But for the purists out there Summit carries a full line of heat tubes from Scott Drake, including the full circuit one where filtered air is pulled down to the manifold and hot air rises to the carb. Includes the insulating tube. Over kill - yes, but some folks might want it. Type heat riser tube in the Summit search spot.

    MD
     
  2. Eastern Raider

    Eastern Raider Member

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    I have a 200 with a Holley 1bbl on it. When my gas cap was causing a vacume , my glass fuel- filter was less than half full. With the vacume problem I could only run on the accelerator pumps.
     
  3. Renton5

    Renton5 Member

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    Hi goberts101,
    The mechanic at the Mustang shop I took the car to said he believed
    I put on the wrong spacer gaskets from the rebuild kit. He didn't see
    anything wrong with manifold. He'll check all the hoses and connections.
    Then I'll take the car out for a long drive on surface streets just to make
    sure all is well. He suggested that with the high miles on the engine, I
    ought to replace the timing chain and water pump, which I'll do. I'll also
    put in the Pertronix ignition and coil. It seems like I'm re-building this
    engine one piece at a time!
     
  4. Craig Selvey

    Craig Selvey Indiana State Rep - MCCI

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    Unless you are having issues...I would not bother with the timing chain. If the fan wiggles a little when you grab ahold of it...means the bearing in the water pump is bad. If it is good...and you have no leaks, I would leave the water pump alone as well.
     
    Ronald Hopkins likes this.
  5. groberts101

    groberts101 Member

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    Couldn't agree more. Mechanics are damned good at increasing their business when old cars like these come through their doors. Perpetual and almost never ending repair cycles begin to eat away at a car guys enthusiasm to even own one of these old cars. At least they're easier to work on and parts are cheap enough but it all adds up after a short time.

    Problem is that you can keep tossing money at em' and think things are all hunky dory.. only then to abruptly realize that old trans starts a shifting funny and you must tear into it yet AGAIN.. or the valve stem seals start leaking more and more as you get the tune up closer to optimum and likely start driving it a bit harder than you used to when it maybe didn't run quite as well. Power goes up.. 10% increase is not uncommon with a good tune up and some upgrades.. cylinder pressure rises and every old component starts to get taxed harder than ever before. Always something with these old cars unless you do a full restoration of every component all at once to start the component life cycle all over again from a fresh baseline. Even then though.. things don't always go as planned, parts aren't made nearly as well as they used to be, and all things mechanical tend to toss big fat greasy wrench's into even the best laid plans. Best advice is to put out each brush fire as it crops up rather than tossing tons of water where there isn't any flame in sight.
     
  6. 71gold

    71gold Frank Cooper Supporting Member

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    I agree with...groberts101...
    it's like doing a...top end...job and then the...bottom end...goes out from the new found compression...:yup:
     
  7. WA8DDN

    WA8DDN Member

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    If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
     
  8. 71gold

    71gold Frank Cooper Supporting Member

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    got this thing fixed yet...:huh:
     
  9. Russell

    Russell Orejano Supporting Member

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    Fix it until its broke...then order another s tarternator!
     

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