Homemade Tools or Cheap Tricks

Discussion in 'Tool & Shop Talk' started by rthomas771, Mar 1, 2009.

  1. Blown 5.0

    Blown 5.0 Hooked on BOOST MEMBER

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    I also use this method to work on the valve springs as i don't like to use a air hold. This way there is no worry about a valve falling if pressure drops or you mistakenly break the seal.
     
  2. Mavman72

    Mavman72 Gone backwards but lookin' forward

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    Yup...done that on plenty of crown vic mod motors in the past...Yeesh I forgot about that...Now you made me remeber...gotta go back to therapy now...LOL...
     
  3. Bryant

    Bryant forgot more than learned

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    you can use a long screw drive or pry bar or long socket extention as a stethascope by holding one end to your ear and touching the other end to different parts of the motor, trans, or diff. to try to locate noises.
    you can also use a pice of heater hose to listen for vac. leaks and exhast leaks. hold one end to your ear and move the other one around the intake car and vac lines listening for a rushing air noise. for the exhast you hear the ticking of the exhast really loud when you pass the leak.
    i recomend listening to your motors while there isnt any noise problems. its pretty interesing to here what all the noises they make that you dont normaly here.
     
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  4. Rando76

    Rando76 Member

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    I do that too - it's a great way to identify bad water pumps, alternators, etc.
     
  5. blugene

    blugene Senior member

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    I remember once I used my dome light for a test light, does that count? :D
     
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  6. hotrod-daddy

    hotrod-daddy Member

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    For some of those stubborn phillip headed screws that hold the head lights in.....I jab the screwdriver in the dirt first (if I'm in the shop, I use some valve grinding compound).....the mi-nute abrasives will grip onto the fastener(y)
     
  7. Blown 5.0

    Blown 5.0 Hooked on BOOST MEMBER

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    Since you mentioned valve grinding compound, Ever had a big nut as on a spindle that the threads wernt quite rite? Take some valve grinding compound and put on the threads, Now start the nut by hand, turning the nut back and fourth and it will eventually smooth out the threads. It is time consuming but it does work. This is not for threads that has been hit with a hammer.
     
  8. Blown 5.0

    Blown 5.0 Hooked on BOOST MEMBER

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    Thought of another, Got a bearing race that you just cant seem to get out. Use a welder (wire works best for me) Run a bead around the inside of the race, Now the race will usually just fall out.Sometimes you will have to let it cool some.
     
  9. Blown 5.0

    Blown 5.0 Hooked on BOOST MEMBER

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    Must be a good morning ( i don't have to work) anyway they just keep coming to me today. Ever need to enlarge an existing hole with a hole saw? Cant figure out how to center the saw? Take the saw that is the same size or just a little larger than the existing hole, Now find a thick piece of wood and cut out a plug with the saw of the same size as the hole you want to enlarge. Take the plug of wood,( check to see how tight it fits the hole as you may have to sand down the plug) now using the same pilot bit slip the plug down into the size hole saw you intend to use. You may need 2 or 3 plugs just depends on how deep the saw you want to use is. Now take a small hose clamp and clamp around the pilot bit to keep the wood from trying to come off. You now have a pilot for the existing hole.
     

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    Last edited: Mar 6, 2009
  10. 72MAVGRABHER

    72MAVGRABHER Maverick Mechanic

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    I guess I'll chime in one for our spark plugs, since its tight and what not..

    I use a piece of rubber hose (fuel Line, etc) slide onto the end of the plug snuggly and it helps to start and spin the plugs in the hard to reach angles and places..

    i have more, but that one stuck out.
     
  11. rthomas771

    rthomas771 Member

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    Balancing a driveshaft
    1) Place the car on a lift or jackstands and remove the rear wheels and install the lug nuts with their flat side against the brake drums.
    2) Run the engine in high gear to a speedometer speed of 40 to 50 mph.
    4) with a piece of chalk taped on end of a broom handle carefully touch the piece of chalk close to the rear of the drive shaft, it will leave a mark on the shaft that will indicate the location of the heavy spot of the shaft.. Use a stand to support and steady the broom stick or use a runout fixture.
    5) Gently apply the brakes and turn off the engine.
    6) Install the two hose clamps on the drive shaft so that the screw assemblies are directly opposite the chalk mark.
    7) Tighten the clamps and run the engine to the desired speed again.
    8) If no vibration is felt, install the wheels, and road test it.
    9) If a vibration is felt, rotate the two clamps away from each other in equal amounts, tighten the test. Repeat this procedure until no vibration is felt. Then install the wheels and road test it.

    Note: A dented or damage driveshaft can not be balanced and must be replaced.
    Warning: Do not get under the car when the engine is running and in gear.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. rthomas771

    rthomas771 Member

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    I guess this will fall under Homemade Tools.

    [​IMG]
    An old furnace blower bolted to a old pressure washer cart.

    [​IMG]
    A retired garden hose reel to store your extension cords.
     
  13. elliot

    elliot Member

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    My brother made a funnel from a 1 quart oil container, forgot to take the cap off and ended up getting oil all over the engine any way. It was pretty funny
     
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  14. Mavericknutt

    Mavericknutt member

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    Elliot you know I have to ask........how much had your brother had to drink:huh:(inside joke)
     
  15. Jsarnold

    Jsarnold Senior Member

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    Use for your old fuel tank

    I want to use play sand for sand blasting. Its cheap and I can blast in the back yard and not bother to recover it. Problem is, its always wet and and clogs the blaster.

    Solution: cut the top off an old fuel tank and use it for a drying pan. A couple of dry days in the sun with a little stirring and its dry as a bone.
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2011

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